Jainworld
Jain World
Sub-Categories of Passions
Preface
Publisher's Note
Author’s Note
Mahavira: A Non-Violent Revolutionary
Transfer of Embryo
  Socio-political Conditions
  Vajji's Democracy
  Magadha and Srenika
  Ajatasatru Vajjis
  Princely following of Mahavira
  Social Conditions
  Intellectual Fervour
  Revolutionary push by Mahavira
  Significant Events
  Indra's Offer of Protection
  Five Resolves at Morak Hermitage
  Education Rather than Exposure
  Poisonous Fangs of Canda Kausika
  States of a Digambara
  Association with Gosala
  Candanabala : First Head of Women Disciples
  Final Act of Nirjara
  Attainment of Kaivalya
  First Ganadharas
  Muttanam-Moyaganam
  THE ULTIMATE REALITY
  ONTOLOGY OF ATMAN, THE SELF
  FACT OF THE MATTER
  JOURNEY TO FREEDOM
  ETHICS OF RESPONSIBILITY
  Actions follow the Doer
  Search for Responsibilty and Sramana Line
  Mahavira's Synthesis
  Psychological Approach of Mahavira
  Categories of Karmas
  Duration of Karmic Bondage
  Nature of Bondage
  Mitigation of Bondage
  Fresh Karmas
  Life's activities
  Even good actions bind, if motivated
  Consequences of Karma Theory
  MECHANICS OF CHANGE
  Process of Change and Nine Tattvas
  Essential Tendency of Jiva
  Papa' and ‘Punya' : Both of Binding Nature
  Asrava (Influx)
  Bandha (Bondage)
  Samvara
  Nirjara (Shedding of Accumulated Karmas)
  Moksa (Final Liberation)
  PLURALISTIC REALISM
  THEORY RELATIVITY
  MODUS OPERANDI
  Enlightened Consciousness
  Self, the starting point
  Will and Eagerness
  Upadana-Nimittan
  Bhavana or Anupreksa (Reflection)
  Twelve Vratas of House-holder
  Prayer
  Dhyana (Meditation)
  Lesya (Disposition)
  Code of Conduct for Monks - Modus Operandi
  Austerities (Tapascarya)
  Sanllekhana
  A PATH-WAY OF LIFE
  APPENDICES
  Appendix - A
  Appendix - B
  Appendix - C
  Appendix - D
  Appendix - E
  BIBLIOGRAPHY

ETHICS OF RESPONSIBILITY

Justice T.U.Mehta

Actions follow the doer, Search for Responsibility and Sramana line, Mahavira's Synthesis, Theories of Yadrcchavada (Freewill), Gosala's Niyativada (Determinism), Other Theories (Kalavada : Time theory, Svabhavavada : Theories of Intrinsic Nature, and Isvaravada : Theory of Ruling Force), Mahavira's Approach (Synthesis resulting from Syadvada), Psychological approach of Mahavira (Emphasis on Bhava, Intention, Dr. Jung's deeper level of sub-conscious is Mahavira's theory of Bhava-karma, Mahavira's rejection of Jamali's theory of �Kade-Kade', Cosmic law of causation and Karmic body), Categories of Karmas (Gautam's dilemma), Duration of Karmic Bondage ,Nature of Bondage, Mitigation of Bondage, Fresh Karmas, Life's activities (Actions without attachment), Good actions bind if motivated, Consequences of Karma Theory 1.

"If the world is will, it must be a world of suffering. And first, because, Will itself indicates want, and its grasp is always greater than its reach, for every wish that is satisfied, there remain ten that are denied. Desire is infinite, fulfilment is limited. It is like the alms thrown to a beggar, that keeps him alive today in order that his misery may be prolonged tomorrow. As long as our consciousness is filled by our will, so long as we have fears, so long as we are given into the throngs of desires, with their constant hopes and fears, so long as we are subject to willing, we can never have lasting happiness or peace. The realised desire develops a new desire, and so on, endlessly."

Schopenhauer.