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Editor's Note

 

INTRODUCTION

 

UMASVATI VACAKA�S PRASAMARATIPRAKARANA-A STUDY

  LIFE: FAMILY, CASTE, DATE, SECT AND WORKS
 

PRASAMARATIPRAKARANA IS A WORK OF UMASVATI

 

SUMMARY OF PRASAMARATI 

 

COMMENTARIES ON PRASAMARATI PRAKARANA

  ETHICAL ASPECT OF PRASAMARATI PRAKARANA:
   

ACARA OF THE SADHUS (MONKS)              

   

ACARA OF THE HOUSEHOLDERS   

  PHILOSOPHICAL ASPECT OF PRASAMARATI PRAKARANA:    
   

Tattvas

   

SUBSTANCE         

   

 SYADVADA-THEORY OF NON-ABSOLUTISM 

   

CLASSIFICATION OF KNOWLEDGE

   

COSMOLOGY 

   

THE DOCTRINE OF KARMA

 

COMPARISON BETWEEN TATTVARTHADHIGAMASUTRA AND PRASAMARATIPRAKRANA.

 

COMPARISON OF PRASAMARATIPRAKARANA WITH JAINA AGAMAS101 AND SOME NON-JAINA WORKS

 

CRITICAL REMARKS ON PRASAMARATIPRAKRANA

 

Prashmartiprakranam l  

 

Ath Shastrasya Pithbandhah: ll1ll    

 

1.  Introduction              

    Ath ksaydhikar: ll2ll      
 

2.  On Passions   

    Ath ragadhyadhikar: ll3ll     
 

3.  On Attachment                

    Ath Karmadhikar: ll4ll  
 

4.  On Karma     

    Ath karnarthadhikardvayam: ll5-6ll    
 

5-6.  On Cause of Birth and Death  

    Ath Madsthanadhikar: ll7ll    
 

7.  On Pride             

    Ath Aacharadhikar: ll8ll  
 

Ath Bhavanadhikar: ll9ll   

 

On Reflection                

    Ath Dharmadhikar: ll10ll     
 

On religious Virtues             

    Ath kathadhikar: ll11ll 
 

On Religious Stories            

    Ath Jivadhikar: ll12ll 
 

On Soul  

   

Ath Upyogadhikar: ll13ll  

 

On Consciousness          

   

Ath Bhavadhikar: ll14ll

 

On States of Soul   

   

Ath Sadvidhdrvyadhikar: ll15ll  

 

On Six Substances         

   

Ath Charanadhikar: ll16ll

 

On Code of Conduct 

   

Ath Shiladgadhikar: ll17ll 

 

Ath Dhyanddhikar: ll18ll 

 

On Meditation                

   

Ath Shrenyadhikar: ll19ll  

 

On Sreni 

   

Ath Samuddhatadhikar: ll20ll

 

On Code of Conduct 

   

Ath Shiladgadhikar: ll17ll 

 

On Samudghata              

   

Ath Yognirodhadhikar: ll21ll 

 

On Yognirodha        

   

Ath Shivgamanvidhanphaladhikar: ll22ll

 

Description of the path of Liberation and Fruits 

 

Appendix

  Jain Books
  Catalog of Books in English
  Catalog of Books in Hindi
  Catalog of Books in Gujarati
  List of Books, Topics & Sub-topics and Authors


Ath ShreeDumaswativirchitam. 

(ENGLISH CONVERSION OF ORIGINAL LANGUAGE WORDS )

 Prashmartiprakranam l

 

Ath Aacharadhikar: ll8ll 

(Original language words are missing) 

The Jiva stupefied by enjoyment of sense-object on account of observing contrariety between virtue and vice(i.e., virtue as vice and vice as virtue) is to be fully protected by those who are afraid of transmigrations, by grasping and practicing code of conduct (prescribed by Acaranga).  112. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Right faith, Right knowledge, Right conduct, austerity an vigour are the five kinds of right conduct, preached by Jinas.  This (right conduct) is to be observed in due order.  113. 

(Original language words are missing) 

One has to protect six kinds of Jivakayas (i.e., all beings) and has to renounce attachment to tradition of worldly relations (such as father, mother, son etc.) Hardships (such as cold, beat etc.) must be conquered and one should have unflinching faith (in words of Jina).  114. 

(Original language words are missing) 

One should feel afraid of mundane life, think over the right means of annihilation of Karmas, serve gurus and elders, perform penance in accordance with injunctions and renounce (association) with women.  115. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Alms should be accepted in accordance with the rules (prescribed in Acaranga); that place is to be used to sleep which is disassociated from women, animals, eunuch; carefulness (Lit. purity) must be maintained in respect of walking, talking, clothing, utensils, procurement of provisions and taking food; (and) (monk) should choose right place to dwell, to perform meditation (or study), for evacuating bowels, etc and (he) should be detached from sounds and beauty (form).  He (monk) should serve (other monks) in reciprocal manner.  He should have firm faith in five great vows and must be completely free from all kinds of attachments; (and) this code of conduct for monks narrated in eighteen thousand words (in Acaranga) observed in due order roots out the attachment etc.; and for him (that monk) who is whole-heartedly engrossed in observing the teachings described in Acaranga, there is never any slit of time, where he will meet with defeat.  116-119. 

(Original language words are missing) 

After hearing the story of ghost16 (pisaca) and the story of protecting the virtuous woman17 (Lit.  daughter-in-law), one must constantly keep ones own self busy in observing self-restraint. 

(Original language words are missing) 

All kinds of (worldly) prosperities of mortals are of the nature of changing every moment, cause of untold misery and all unions ending in separation.18.  121. 

(Original language words are missing) 

What is the use of sense-object enjoyments which are transcient, dreadful, desired (again and again) and which are dependent (on external objects)? In this matter, therefore, an attempt should be made to obtain happiness of spiritual calmness, which is eternal, undaunted and depends on one�s own self.  122. 

(Original language words are missing) 

It is, far better to exert that much sincere effort to control the sense-organs than do endeavour to the same extent to gratify the sense-organs which are covetous for their objects.  123. 

(Original language words are missing) 

The soul, full of attachment acquires happiness born of the covetousness of all sense-objects.  Multiplied by infinite crores is the happiness that a detached soul easily acquires.  124. 

(Original language words are missing) 

The attached person suffers from sorrow which springs from thought of separation (from beloved ones) and association with undesirable ones.  (But) detached person is not touched at all by this sorrow.  125. 

(Original language words are missing) 

How is it possible for others to obtain that happiness which is acquired by that soul after controlling the hankering after (women, men and neuter); passions, and being undisturbed by mockery, liking, disliking and grief; and unaffected by dread and reproach.  126. 

(Original language words are missing) 

A wise (monk) mentally agitated, even though endowed with right faith, right knowledge, meditation and austerity will not be able to acquire that virtue which a person who has resorted to tranquillity (i.e., who is detached) attains to.  127. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Neither sovereign nor God of gods, can possibly attain to that happiness which a monk detached from worldly activities acquires in this life itself.  128. 

(Original language words are missing) 

A (real) monk giving up worldly warries, engrossed in the reflection on the realization of self; conquering greed, anger and lust, and being free from fever of (anger, etc.) dwells happily.  129. 

(Original language words are missing) 

In the case of monks, both the worldly life (i.e., going for food, water, etc.) and preservation of body (i.e., healthy body) are desirable (i.e., approved by the Scriptures) if they are for the performance of religious duties.  130. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Since, the world (or society) is the supporting ground of all religius minded monks, that should be given up (in reality) which is against the (norms of) society and religion.  131. 

(Original language words are missing) 

The body is expedient (to perform religious duties), and its means (food for sustenance) are dependent on society (i.e., householders).  Thus society should be approached without prejudice to the religious path.  132. 

(Original language words are missing) 

A monk has always, to avoid that path of fault with special effort by one�s own self, by (following) which society) becomes unserviceable and full of hatred.  133. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Injunction about the acceptable and non-acceptable (of) food is described in aphorism of pindaisana (of Acaranga).  Following that (rule, in accepting and enjoying food, etc.), there is no fear of disease.  134. 

(Original language words are missing) 

The (monk) should take food only to observe restraint (sustaining body, not for enjoyment), just like applying the ointment on wound, applying oil on axils, and like a snake (which swallows food without attachment to its taste) and (story of) eating flesh of a daughter.19.  (to sustain life).  135. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Like a wooden stick tasty food is to be accepted (by monk) without any attachment to it and (in the same way), tasteless food without any aversion.  136. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Where is the necessity of medicines for him (a monk) who takes food after comprehending time (proper season), place, quantity, constitution of body, heaviness and lightness (of food material) and one�s own capacity (to digest).  137. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Everything that is described (in Scriptures) about acceptable and non-acceptable in respect of food, resting place, cloth, utensils, etc. are to preserve the physique of genuine religion.  138. 

(Original language words are missing) 

(That) monk, who has knowledge of rule of acceptable and nonacceptable (of food etc.), who is assisted by other) wise monks, (or also who is assisted by non-attachment), and by nature humble, moves unaffected (by passions), in this world, which is soiled by passions.  139. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Just as a lotus, born in mud is unsmeared by it, similarly, the monk, possessed of materials for performing religious duties is un-affected by those things.  140. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Just like a horse, though adorned with decorating ornaments is unattached (to them), similarly, the Nirgrantha (who is free from all kinds of worldly knots), though possessed of (religious) materials is unattached to them.  141. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Eight kinds of Karma, wrong belief, want of control, inauspicious activities constitute all knots.  He who sincerely tries to win over this is called Nirgrantha.  142. 

(Original language words are missing) 

That thing is, ultimately acceptable (to  monk) which helps (to gain) knowledge, (to follow right) conduct, (to perform) austerity and which annihilates the passions.  All other things are (to be treated as) un-acceptable.  143. 

(Original language words are missing) 

That thing which is though acceptable, becomes un-acceptable (for monks), if it obstructs (or weakens right faith, right knowledge and right conduct and the acceptance of which is the cause of contempt of Jinagamas.  144. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Even pure and acceptable (things such as) food, resting place, cloth, utensil or medicine, etc. (may) become un-acceptable (on account of some reason) and un-acceptable things may also become acceptable (due to certain circumstances).  145. 

(Original language words are missing) 

A thing becomes acceptable (only) considering thoroughly, place, time, man, stage of life, utility (and) auspicious result.  Nothing becomes acceptable or unacceptable from one-sided angle.  146. 

(Original language words are missing) 

A monk, should, indeed, reflect upon, speak and perform the deeds, which do not become cause of sorrow for ones own self and for others in this life and life hereafter and in all times to come.  147. 

(Original language words are missing) 

A monk, indeed, who is an aspirant of highest truth (Moksa) has to reflect upon all the objects which are attached to senses and which are obstacles in the path of non-attachment.  148. 

Here ends Chapter on Code of Conduct