Jainworld
Jain World
Sub-Categories of Passions
Foreword
I. JAINA TRADITION UPTO MAHAVIRA
II. PRINCE MAHAVIRA
IV. PRECEPTS OF MAHAVIRA
V. DOCTRINES OF MAHAVIRA
  VII. SIGNIFICANCE OF MAHAVIRA

Chapter - IV PRECEPTS OF MAHAVIRA

 

Dr. V.A.Sangave

The ascetic life of those, who are intent on self-control, is comparable to living in heaven; while the life of those, who do not practise self-control, is like living in hell. :

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Mortify yourself; give up the feeling of tenderness for the body; conquer desires and then you will realise that you have conquered all sorrow and misery; cut off all types of attach ment, suppress hatred, and thus you will be happy in this worldly existence.

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He, who is desirous of storing, is a householder and not a monk.

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A monk should always concentrate on the highest and most pure type of meditation, be free from Nidana (i.e. carving for worldly or temporal gains in lieu of his austerities), should possess nothing, and move about in the world completely disregarding his body, till such time as death overtakes him.

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How can a monk, who cannot control his passions and who is swayed away by distracting thoughts and is discouraged at every step, can ever possibly practise the rules of asceticism?

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He, who abandons the evil thought of attachment to worldly objects, can alone give up possessions; he alone is a monk who has

 

realised the real danger in the world, and who has no worldly attachments.

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A monk should not care for sleep, should avoid cutting jokes, should not take interest in the secrets of others, but should always be occupied and devoted to his studies.

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A monk is without any possessions, without egoism, without attachment, without vanity or conceit, he is impartial toWards all living beings whether mobile or immobile.

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A monk is indifferent to success or failure, happiness and misery, life and death, so also to censure or praise, and honour or insults.

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The enlightened monks, who are completely disinterested in the world, who are keen on receiving alms from different places and not from one place only, and who are self-controlled, are like the bees; and that is why they are called the true monks.

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A monk should not eat for the sake of the delicious taste of the food, but far the sustenance of life and body, not being greedy for

 

delicacies, nor eager for good fare, and restraining his tongue and being free from cupidity.

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If any body abuses a monk, he should not get angry with him.

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One who never tells stories that will incite quarrels, never gets angry, always controls his senses, and is calm and serene, who is always pursuing firmly the precepts laid down for observ ing self-control, is always unpurturbed, and never offends or insults others-he alone is a true monk.

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A monk should have compassion towards all beings, should be of a forgiving nature, should be restrained and chaste, and should avoid all sinful activities: He should move about in the world with all his senses properly controlled.

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A monk should not use words of censure behind the back of another, he should not use painful language in the presence of another; so also he should not use determinative expression as also unpalatable expression; a monk who behaves thus, is really a worthy one.